8440 Nowlen St. Mentor, OH 44060
+1 (440) 477 1192

Meet Checkride Examiner

PAUL MANNION – DPE CFII MEI ATP
With over 21 years of experience as a certified flight instructor (CFI), and 8 years of experience as a designated pilot examiner (DPE), Paul Mannion knows how to prepare students physically and mentally for a checkride. Paul has somewhere around 10,000 hours of flight time logged and has given over 150 checkrides. He is able to give the following checkrides: Sport, Private, Instrument, Multi-Engine, Commercial, CFI, CFII, MEI. In addition, Paul does license/rating renewals and reinstatements. 
Click Here for more information

Checkrides Offered

Click the tabs to find out more about each license.

What is the first step I need to take to become a sport pilot?

You should first consider getting either an FAA medical certificate or plan on using your current and valid U.S. driver’s license. Additionally, you will need to get a student pilot certificate. Please see the information below for more details on the option you can choose:

FAA medical and the student pilot certificate:

  • Medical certificates, or “medicals” for short, are required for anyone other than a sport pilot who is acting as pilot in command. There are three kinds of medicals: first, second, and third class, each with its own requirements, duration, and privileges.
  • Usually the medical certificate and student pilot certificate are combined on one form, FAA Form 8420-2, and are issued by a doctor, called an aviation medical examiner (AME), who has been approved by the FAA to administer the medical exam.
  • The combination medical/student pilot certificate is easy to carry in your logbook, wallet, or purse and required to be in your possession when you fly solo. The difference between the regular medical certificate and the combination medical and student pilot certificate is that, on the back of the medical/student pilot certificate, there is space for the flight instructor’s endorsements that are required for your solo flights.
  • A medical is not required for operations in a glider or balloon.
  • For more information, read AOPA’s subject report, Pilot’s Guide to Medical Certification.

Driver’s license and the student pilot certificate:

  • The Sport Pilot rule allows a pilot to fly light-sport aircraft without the need for an FAA medical certificate. However, a sport pilot must hold at least a current and valid U.S. driver’s license in order to exercise this privilege. The only exceptions are for operations in a glider or balloon, which does not require a driver’s license.
  • A person using a current and valid U.S. driver’s license must comply with each restriction and limitation imposed by that person’s U.S. driver’s license and any judicial or administrative order applying to the operation of a motor vehicle. That person must also meet the requirements of 14 CFR 61.23(c)(2), which states the following:
    • Have been found eligible for the issuance of at least a third class airman medical certificate at the time of his or her most recent application (if the person has applied for a medical certificate);
    • Not have had his or her most recently issued medical certificate (if the person has held a medical certificate) suspended or revoked or most recent Authorization for a Special Issuance of a Medical Certificate withdrawn; and
    • Not know or have reason to know of any medical condition that would make that person unable to operate a light-sport aircraft in a safe manner.
  • A student pilot certificate, FAA Form 8710-2, can be obtained from your local flight standards district office (FSDO) or designated pilot examiner (DPE).

What are the sport pilot eligibility requirements?

  • For the sport pilot certificate, you must:
    • Be at least 17 years old (or 16 years old if you are applying to operate a glider or balloon).
    • Be able to read, speak, write, and understand English.
    • Hold at least a third class medical, or hold a current and valid U.S. driver’s license for operations in light-sport aircraft other than a glider or balloon.

What are the training requirements for becoming a sport pilot?

  • Training requirements for a sport pilot certificate with airplane category —
    • A minimum of 20 hours flight time including:
      • 15 hours of flight training from an authorized instructor.
      • 5 hours solo flight.
    • Flight training must include at least:
      • 2 hours cross-country flight training.
      • 10 takeoffs and landings to a full stop.
      • One solo cross-country flight of at least 75 nautical miles total distance with a full-stop landing at a minimum of two points and one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of at least 25 nautical miles between takeoff and landing locations.
      • 2 hours flight training in preparation for the practical test.
      • Ground training from an instructor or home-study course.
    • FAA knowledge test on applicable aeronautical knowledge areas.
    • FAA practical test for the applicable light-sport aircraft privilege.
    • Sport pilot certificates will be issued without category/class designation — logbook endorsement will be provided for category and class per FAR 61.317.

 

*Information found on AOPA. View more here https://www.aopa.org/advocacy/advocacy-briefs/frequently-asked-questions-about-sport-pilot 

Total Time: 40 hours minimum which consists of at least:

Dual: 20 hours minimum of flight training with an instructor on the Private Pilot areas of operation including:

  1. 3 hours of cross country flight training in a single engine airplane;
  2. 3 hours of night flight training in a single engine airplane, that includes at least:
    a) 1 cross country flight of over 100 nm total distance; and
    b) 10 T/O’s and 10 landings to a full stop with each involving a flight in the traffic pattern at an airport.
  3. 3 hours of flight training by reference to instruments in a single engine airplane; and
  4. 3 hours of flight training in a single engine airplane within the 60 days prior to the practical test.

Solo: 10 hours minimum of solo flying in a single engine airplane on the Private Pilot areas of operation including:

  1. 5 hours of solo cross country flying;
  2. 1 solo cross country flight of at least 150nm total distance with full stop landings at 3 points and one segment of at least 50nm between T/O and landings; and
  3. 3 T/O’s and landings to a full stop at an airport with an operating control tower.

Eligibility requirements: General.

To be eligible for a private pilot certificate, a person must:

(a) Be at least 17 years of age for a rating in other than a glider or balloon.

(b) Be at least 16 years of age for a rating in a glider or balloon.

(c) Be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English language. If the applicant is unable to meet one of these requirements due to medical reasons, then the Administrator may place such operating limitations on that applicant’s pilot certificate as are necessary for the safe operation of the aircraft.

(d) Receive a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor who:

(1) Conducted the training or reviewed the person’s home study on the aeronautical knowledge areas listed in §61.105(b) of this part that apply to the aircraft rating sought; and

(2) Certified that the person is prepared for the required knowledge test.

(e) Pass the required knowledge test on the aeronautical knowledge areas listed in §61.105(b) of this part.

(f) Receive flight training and a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor who:

(1) Conducted the training in the areas of operation listed in §61.107(b) of this part that apply to the aircraft rating sought; and

(2) Certified that the person is prepared for the required practical test.

(g) Meet the aeronautical experience requirements of this part that apply to the aircraft rating sought before applying for the practical test.

(h) Pass a practical test on the areas of operation listed in §61.107(b) of this part that apply to the aircraft rating sought.

(i) Comply with the appropriate sections of this part that apply to the aircraft category and class rating sought.

(j) Hold a U.S. student pilot certificate, sport pilot certificate, or recreational pilot certificate.

 

*Information from First Flight. View more here https://www.firstflight.com/private-pilot-requirements/ 

A good question to ask yourself before you start instrument training is, why do you want this rating? The answers can usually be grouped into three areas. One common answer is that it’s a good thing to have in your pocket just in case you need it. Next is that it’s just another important step to a career in aviation. The third reason is that you want to increase the productivity of your personal or business flying.

There are different ways to obtain training for your instrument rating, and the reason you want the rating may have an effect on the training method that you choose. Should you enroll in a highly regimented FAR Part 141 school? Perhaps a full-time or part-time instructor at your local airport could do the job. Then, there are the accelerated courses. Some of these come to your location and provide intense training in your own airplane. Others require that you travel to their location. These accelerated courses usually have you finished up in 10 to 12 days. What’s the best? That depends on you. The articles included below will provide information to help you decide.

The instrument rating requirements, as specified in 14 CFR 61.65, are summarized here:

A person who applies for an instrument rating must:

  • Hold at least a current private pilot certificate or be concurrently applying for a private pilot certificate with an airplane, helicopter, or powered-lift rating appropriate to the instrument rating sought.
  • Be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English language.

You must have logged the following:

  • At least 50 hours of cross-country flight time as pilot in command. At least 10 of these hours must be in airplanes for an instrument-airplane rating.
  • A total of 40 hours of actual or simulated instrument time on the areas of operation listed in 61.65(c).
  • At least 15 hours of instrument flight training from an authorized instructor in the aircraft category for the instrument rating sought.

For instrument-airplane rating, instrument training on cross-country flight procedures that includes at least one cross-country flight in an airplane that is performed under instrument flight rules. This flight must consist of:

  • A distance of at least 250 nm along airways or ATC-directed routing.
  • An instrument approach at each airport.
  • Three different kinds of approaches with the use of navigation systems (Example: ILS, VOR, GPS, etc).
  • At least 3 hours of instrument training that is appropriate to the instrument rating sought from an authorized instructor in preparation for the checkride within two calendar months before the examination date.

 

*Information found on AOPA. View more here: https://www.aopa.org/training-and-safety/active-pilots/ratings-and-endorsements/instrument-rating

Multi-Engine rated pilots will experience the remarkable improvement in aircraft performance capability along with an increase in speed, power, and rate of climb. Managing the complexity and workload of a multi-engine aircraft is both exhilarating and rewarding.

The multi-engine land rating is an “add-on” to an existing single-engine land private, commercial, or ATP certificate. For this rating, both VFR and IFR operations will be emphasized. There are no minimum time requirements for the multi-engine land rating; however you will need an instructor endorsement for flight and ground training prior to taking the checkride. There is no written exam, only an oral exam and practical checkride are required.

While a multi-engine rating can be added to a private pilot certificate, in most cases it makes more sense to wait until a pilot has a commercial pilot certificate and instrument rating as this will save the pilot a substantial amount of money in the long run.

What are the prerequisites?

  • Pilot must have a current FAA medical
  • Pilot must provide proof of citizenship (Passport or Birth Certificate) or TSA approval
  • Pilot must already be a single engine private pilot
  • Pilot should be current (Not required, however additional hours may be required if the pilot is not current)

 

*Information found on aspen flying club. View more here: https://www.aspenflyingclub.com/flight-training/advanced-flight-training/multi-engine-rating/

COMMERCIAL PILOT LICENSE (CPL):

In the most straightforward way put, a commercial license allows a pilot to compensated for their services. This term encompasses a broad range of pilot careers including flight instructors, cargo pilots, tour pilots, ferry pilots, glider tow pilots, and airplane pilots. Depending on the desired job, further education and training may be required. The commercial pilot license is more intensive and covers a broader range of aviation topics during flight school. A commercial pilot license is a necessary step for becoming a pilot for a commercial airline, or any other career involved in aviation.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A COMMERCIAL PILOT LICENSE:

  • Must be at least 18 years of age
  • Must be able to speak, write, read, and understand the English language
  • Hold at least a private pilot license
  • Hold at least a second-class medical certificate from the FAA
  • Log training hours by authorized instructor
  • Pass a pilot knowledge test administered by the FAA
  • Have at least 250 hours of recorded flight time:
    • 100 hours in powered aircraft
    • 100 hours of Pilot-In-Command (PIC) training
  • Pass the FAA written and FAA checkride flight exams.

 

*Information found on VT AAA. View more here: https://www.vt-aaa.com/what-it-takes-to-become-a-commercial-pilot/

Who Can Apply for a CFI Rating

First, it’s important to consider whether you’re even eligible to apply for a CFI. You need to:

  • Be a licensed commercial pilot license with current medical certification
  • Have at least 250 hours of flight time (although more is better)
  • Have appropriate instrument ratings for the craft you intend to teach on

You can begin training as a CFI right after you earn your commercial pilot license, or you can wait until you have some work experience to draw on. It’s up to you.

Your FOI and CFI Exams

To earn your CFI, you need to take two written tests. These cover the Fundamentals of Instruction (FOI) and the FAA Certified Flight Instructor Knowledge Exam. Both exams require intensive study—even the knowledge exam, which covers a great deal of material you will have encountered as you studied to become a recreational, private, and then a commercial pilot. The FOI exam covers the teaching and learning process, including instructional techniques.

Student Teaching

After you have taken and passed these exams, you’ll want to begin practice teaching with an experienced flight instructor. In your practice teaching, the experienced instructor will act as a “student”, and you will “teach” him or her what to do. You will:

  • Brief the “student” before practice flights
  • Demonstrate pre-flight checks
  • Ride in the right seat and coach the “student” through in-flight maneuvers
  • De-brief the student after landing

It will be your responsibility to develop lesson plans that teach everything your student will need to know, based on the FAA Practical Test Standards. Take the time to prepare your lessons, and you will have a better chance of success.

The Checkride

After a minimum of 15 hours practice teaching (but probably more) your supervising instructor should sign you off as ready for your checkride. Make sure you show up looking the part of a professional flight instructor, and do your best to behave exactly as you would in a teaching situation. Explain things thoroughly. Watch the examiner as if he really is a student, and don’t let him get away with anything. With proper preparation, you should pass your checkflight and earn your certificate.

 

*Information found from Spartan College. View more here: https://www.spartan.edu/how-to-become-a-certified-flight-instructor/

Certified Flight Instructor – Instrument (CFII)

The Federal Aviation Regulations require that candidates for pilot certificates, ratings or endorsements receive a certain amount of training, both in the air and on the ground, in order to obtain that certificate. CFIIs are responsible for teaching pilots how to fly in instrument conditions as well as ensuring that instrument rated pilots maintain their proficiency.

Privileges

  • Provide required training for instrument rating candidates
  • Endorse instrument rating candidates to take FAA oral and practical exams
  • Conduct instrument proficiency checks for instrument rated pilots

Requirements (Part 61)

You must possess a commercial certificate in order to become a Certified Flight Instructor Instrument. You must also pass the Flight Instructor Instrument written examination. The various requirements necessary to prepare an instrument instructor candidate vary based on the individual’s level of experience. The following breakdown is a conservative estimate based on prior candidates, but please be aware that this is an ESTIMATE for individuals who have already acquired their initial instructor rating:

Ground (10 Hours)

Ground lessons are a major component of flight instructor training. You and your instructor will cover everything set forth in the Certified Flight Instructor Instrument Practical Test Standards, which essentially requires you to learn how to teach everything set forth in the Instrument Rating Practical Test Standards. You are not only required to possess a solid understanding of all principles, but you must also be able to teach these principles to students, therefore this training will include curriculum planning.

Flight (10 Hours)

The flight portion of this training directly relates to everything you discussed in your ground lessons. You will be required to fly all maneuvers from the right seat within the parameters set forth in the Practical Test Standards. You must also be able to clearly explain how to perform these maneuvers while doing so.

 

Information found from East Coast Aero Club. View more here: http://eastcoastaeroclub.com/our-courses-programs/certified-flight-instructor-instrument-cfii/

Multi-Engine Instructor (MEI)

The Federal Aviation Regulations require that candidates for pilot certificates, ratings or endorsements receive a certain amount of training, both in the air and on the ground, in order to obtain that certificate. MEIs are responsible for teaching pilots how to fly multi-engine aircraft as well as ensuring that certificated pilots maintain their proficiency

Privileges

  • Provide required training for multi-engine rating candidates
  • Endorse multi-engine candidates to take FAA oral and practical exams

Requirements (Part 61)

You must possess a commercial certificate in order to become a Multi Engine Instructor. The various requirements necessary to prepare a flight instructor candidate vary based on the individual’s level of experience. The following breakdown is a conservative estimate based on prior candidates, but please be aware that this is an ESTIMATE for individuals who have already acquired their initial instructor rating:

Ground (10 Hours)

Ground lessons are a major component of flight instructor training. You and your instructor will cover everything set forth in the Multi-Engine Instructor Practical Test Standards, which essentially requires you to learn how to teach everything set forth in the Multi-Engine Practical Test Standards. You are not only required to possess a solid understanding of all principles, but you must also be able to teach these principles to students, therefore this training will include curriculum planning.

Flight (10 Hours)

The flight portion of this training directly relates to everything you discussed in your ground lessons. You will be required to fly all maneuvers from the right seat within the parameters set forth in the Practical Test Standards. You must also be able to clearly explain how to perform these maneuvers while doing so.

 

*Information found on East Coast Aero Club. View more here: http://eastcoastaeroclub.com/our-courses-programs/multi-engine-instructor-mei/

Coming soon!

See how a typical checkride goes

With this checkride preparation video

Checkride Locations

For most checkrides in the Northeast Ohio area, Paul prefers them to be done at Willoughby Lost Nation Airport (KLNN). If you live in Northeast Ohio and prefer to take your checkride at your airport of choice, please let him know ahead of time to make the proper arrangements. Paul is willing to accept most checkrides within a reasonable distance from Lost Nation Airport. 

Come Prepared!

Most checkrides are split up into two parts: the oral exam, and the practical flying test. Everything you will need to know will be in the Airman Certification Standards (ACS) which can be downloaded online or bought through online stores. This is the exact book that checkride examiners use when giving the checkride. Study this thoroughly and make sure you understand each topic before scheduling your checkride. It helps if you can teach the material to another pilot or friend. 

01.

Complete Your Training

Time to have fun! Make sure you and your instructor go over all the requirements per the FAA before scheduling your checkride. There is nothing worse than arriving to a checkride after studying hard and mentally preparing to find out that you are short on the requirements. 

02.

Take the written

Try to take the written exam as soon as you feel comfortable with the material. Getting this out of the way early on will help ease your mind as you approach the day of your checkride. A passing score of 70% or higher is required. The Jeppesen test guide books are a great reference for what the written test will be like. During the checkride, you will go over all the questions you missed on the written so make sure to review those.

03.

Study!!!

Study! Study!! Study!!! Make sure you are fully prepared and feel confident flying the airplane safely by yourself. When you are 100% ready, schedule your checkride a week in advance to give yourself a little extra time to go over the material.

04.

Pass your checkride

Congrats! All that hard work finally paid off, you are officially a licensed pilot. Go on some cool cross-countries, fly with your friends and family, and most importantly, keep on learning. Your pilot’s license is a license to learn. A good pilot is always learning. Fly safely!

Feeling stuck? Sit down with an instructor prior to taking the exam and go over the areas you are having trouble with.
need help?
There are a lot of great study guides and practice exams out there so find one that suits your needs!

Schedule Your  Checkride Today!

Please try to schedule your checkride at least one week in advance. Provide a few alternate dates and times for optimum scheduling results. Make sure you are fully prepared and have reviewed all the material necessary before scheduling your checkride. Best of luck and fly safely!